Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Dr. John Smayda installs a circa 1830 Orton, Preston & Company clock, given to the Libraries by Bob And Maureen Sposato, in preparation for the dedication of the Clock and Tween Space on Tuesday October 30th at 5:00 PM. The clock was made in Farmington Connecticut. Please come in to view this remarkable antique and enjoy the promise of the future through our new Tween Space in the main library rotunda and subsequently at the Tween Space.


Dr. John Smayda installs a circa 1830 Orton, Preston & Company clock, given to the Libraries by Bob And Maureen Sposato, in preparation for the dedication of the Clock and Tween Space on Tuesday October 30th at 5:00 PM. The clock was made in Farmington Connecticut.   

Please come in to view this remarkable antique and enjoy the promise of the future  through our new Tween Space in the main library rotunda and subsequently at the Tween Space.


Shelf Clock Facts

The “Orton, Preston & Company” clock; now held by Farmington libraries ,was made in Farmington circa 1830-40.
These clocks were marketed as improved clocks with brass bushings, wooden movements selling at around $10 each.
The majority of Connecticut clock companies made wooden shelf clocks between 1820 and 1840.
Clocks that were made utilizing wooden movements sold for less than $10
Through innovation mass-produce brass movements became the industry standard.
The Farmington Canal was completed in 1829 and allowed companies such as Williams, Orton and Preston to transport their wares to New Haven and beyond.
Peddlers using horse and wagon also sold clocks throughout New England.
Connecticut clocks were found in most of New England, as far west as Ohio and into the Canadian markets.
After the demise of the Williams Company in 1840 new clock manufacturers were established in Farmington such as “George Marsh” and “Seymour Williams and Porter” to continue on affirming his manufacturing history.