Monday, October 17, 2011

A Sign of Freedom from Signs of History: A look at Farmington and the The Amistad







I am looking forward to learning from Kim A. Silva's January program "A Sign of Freedom from Signs of History" regarding the Amistad Affair and Farmington's involvement and hope you will join us on January 26 at 7:00 Barney Library 71 Main Street.




The leader of the Amistad known as Sengbe Pieh, Joseph Cinque and the "Black Prince" drew his strength from his Mende culture, storytelling and mime. In antebellum America how did this African, who spoke no English, prevail in three courts of law, and capture the interest and sympathy of the American public? Learn about the interconnected history between Farmington and the American School for the Deaf during the Amistad Affair. How and why did the Amistad Africans' tours to raise funds for their journey home become a catalyst for the Civil War?

Kim A. Silva M.A. Deaf Education
Presenter 8th Conference Deaf History International 2000 (and 2012 if my abstract is accepted!)
Coordinator, Amistad Tours The Farmington Historical Society
Board Member, The Freedom Trail
Author, A Sign of Freedom (unpublished manuscript)