Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Thanksgiving,the great All-American holiday

Thanksgiving is always celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November and celebrates the Pilgrims first harvest in 1621 with a feast. Pilgrims should not be confused with Puritans who established Massachusetts Bay Colony, Boston, in 1628.

This is the great All-American holiday, in my book, because it requires us to stop, reflect, be together and remember what life has brought us: family, friends, high school and college football games and a great deal of wonderful food spread out on a well thought out table. Yet, all defined by Turkey size and aromatics.

I wish you the best holiday and hope we can celebrate the simple joys of health and life and safety. In that regard, we each seek consistency in our lives and nothing is truer to that  than the good will and effort given by our Staff, Board, Town Staff and officials, the FVGLA, Friends of the Library and our many volunteers who all together add great value to our work. Indeed, it is remarkable, that during this globally conflicted and volatile times, people still practice a dedication to others quietly and effectively. Indeed, many today are as confused, angry and fearful of their future as others are, yet they take time to make a quiet difference without regard to who the difference comes to, but rather that good for one equals good for all. Dostoevsky’s, the little orphan, presents an emotive and Dostoevskian reality to remind us of the importance of kindness.

I wish everyone health and poetry this thanksgiving season.

All my Best,


Tuesday, November 3, 2015

From Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center to the Farmington Libraries; The Karkowska Sisters Classical Concert Series was fabulous!

The Karkowska Sisters were a great hit here again as the sisters wowed the audience with their virtuosity 
and musical selection at the 
Hoppin Gallery.

Lieutenant James Palache July 3, 1896 - May 15 -1918

Veterans Day 2015

When I ponder Veterans Day, my thoughts naturally go back to my submarine shipmates on TridentDace, and Flying Fish who all served well with me during the Vietnam and the Cold War. Many have since died or were killed in action long ago however, they are still with me in my thoughts and the memories of those who knew and loved them. This Veterans Day, however, my attention is drawn to Lieutenant James Palache, whose memorial plaque resides in the North Wing of the Barney Library. James Palache, Harvard College, class of 1918 left college early to volunteer in the service of his country.   And, while serving, was mortally wounded by a high-explosive shell in Cantigny, France while actively commanding his men in relief of French positions; “but he continued to fight hand to hand with German soldiers whom he subdued, and in so doing gave courage and inspired his comrades”. Lieutenant Palache was Farmington's first casualty and died May 28, 1918.  Farmington’s Joan Hooker remembers when she was in her twenties the Palaches lived here, she said in a 1969 letter: “I think of the boys who, never came back from France. Young Palache died there too, leading his men. He had just written to his father, 'It's the men in the ranks; who count', and I remember his father marching in our Victory Parade"'. Farmington Post No. 53, of the American Legion, bears James Palache' name. His father Whitney Palache, vice-president of the Hartford Insurance Company, set up a fund in our Village Library for the purchase of history books in the promotion of history, in his name during the War to End All Wars. I invite you to read more about Palache and others at our Library by beginning with the enclosed links.